2011-2013
Subtheme 9.1: Genetic Resource Policies for the Poor (GRP 1)
Centers/ProgramsIFPRI
Target RegionsAsia, CWANA, LAC, SSA
Countries of Planned Research Potential Beneficiary Countries
 
Bolivia, China, Ecuador, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda
 
Burkina Faso, Bolivia, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Mali, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda
CGIAR Priorities
1A - Conservation and characterization of staple crops
1B - Promoting conservation ands characterization of under-utilized plant genetic resources to increase the income of the poor
1C - Conservation of indigenous livestock
2C - Enhancing nutritional quality and safety
2D - Genetic enhancement of selected species to increase income generation by the poor
3A - Increasing income from fruit and vegetables
3B - Income increases from livestock
4D - Sustainable agro-ecological intensification in low- and high-potential environments
5A - Science and technology policies and institutions
5C - Rural institutions and their governance
5D - Improving research and development options to reduce rural poverty and vulnerability
Development Activities - Development Activities
Stand-alone Training - Stand-alone Training
Financing Sources
Members: Brazil, FAO, IDB, IDRC, IFAD, Japan, Sweden, United States, World Bank

Non Members: Agricultural Research Council, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Confederacion Colombiana de Algodon, Ethiopia, IKP Trust, Mercy Corps, Others, OXFAM, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Unres+Other Sources, Wageningen University
Project Overview and Rationale

The sustainable management of genetic resources is fundamental for agricultural productivity growth and the improvement of the livelihoods of the rural poor. Among other functions, the sustainable management of genetic resources ensures the viability of agricultural production, contributes to food security, and supports income generation and diet diversity leading to better nutrition. As such, the management of genetic resources is the basis of all crop maintenance, characterization and enhancement programs of the CGIAR and of national agricultural research systems.

The project’s research has two main goals. First it aims at providing new knowledge and policy guidelines to optimize the use of the existing pool of genetic resources and technologies accessible to small farmers in order to minimize their production risk in an increasingly changing environment. Second, it aims at assessing the actual or potential economic impact of new seed-based technologies, constraints to their delivery and adoption, and the conditions under which they are most likely to perform, in order to facilitate the choice and effective introduction of technologies adapted to the need and demand of farmers in developing economies. The rationale for pursuing this research agenda is that the generated outputs will lead to increased uptake of policies, practices, and technologies that will raise the productivity and resilience of small producers and improve their livelihoods in a sustainable manner


Project Outputs
Output Title
1: Assess the role of crop genetic resource management as a tool to increase the resilience of producers to biotic and abiotic constraints.
Output Description
This research involves two studies that focus on the role of genetic resource management strategies in increasing resistance to pest and diseases and to climate variability. The first activity involves the evaluation of the effect of genetic choices on farmers’ vulnerability to pest and diseases. Study areas are located in China, Ecuador, Morocco and Uganda. Valuing this effect will enable us to understand: a) farmer’s decision with respect to genetic choice; and b) the interactions between genetic choice and other production and control inputs. This activity is part of a GEF project: “Conservation and Use of Crop Genetic Diversity to Control Pests and Diseases in Support of Sustainable Agriculture”, coordinated by Bioversity International. The team will use its advanced knowledge in valuing crop diversity to complement with the work of Bioversity International on conservation and use of crop diversity.

The second activity will focus on determining how crop biodiversity, as part of a diversified production system, can help in increasing the resilience of small farmers to climate change. Current literature indicates that biodiversity in agricultural ecosystems can help in maintaining productivity by increasing mean yields and reducing yield variability, especially in vulnerable production system. But it focuses on the output of only one crop and a few years. In contrast, our research will explore long run effects of agro-biodiverse systems. The main specific outputs of this projects include: a) a set of tools to guide the research on adaptation to climate change through agricultural biodiversity, b) elements for designing a long term monitoring system of productivity and resilience, c) the definition of research protocols that can be used and adapted to different regions and latitude, and d) proposed policy instruments that can support conservation and management of agricultural biodiversity.
CGIAR Priorities
1A, 1B, 5D
Countries of Planned Research
Bolivia, China, Ecuador, Ghana, Morocco, Uganda
Intended Users
National research and extension programs in target countries, CGIAR centres working on agricultural biodiversity, NGOs, researchers from universities and agricultural research institutes, government ministries and development agencies.
Outcome
National research programs develop evidence to support and explain the contribution of genetic resources to decrease the vulnerability of farmers to biotic and abiotic stresses.
Impact
Genetic diversity is more broadly / appropriately used by farmers and stakeholders, leading to more sustainable production systems."

Output Target
Year Target Type Target Description
2010
Policy strategies
Case studies of the Pest and Disease project are implemented in Ecuador, Uganda and China. Results are completed.
2011
Practices
Set of tools, approaches, and methods, on agro-biodiverse systems and resilience to climate change developed

Output Title
2: Adoption, socioeconomic, and gender impacts of transgenic crops: guiding methods and policies to maximize the potential of biotechnologies for the poor
Output Description
This research output focuses on two related topics: a) the identification of a practical approach for evaluation and monitoring of socio-economic impacts of transgenic crops in West Africa, and b) the analysis of gender differences in the observed adoption of transgenic crops in developing economies.

First, building on its previous work on the impact assessment of genetically modified crops, the team plans to work on the adoption and validation of a common approach to the ex-ante and assessment and ex-post monitoring of socio-economic effects of transgenic crops in countries of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU). The selected methodology will be validated in the setting of two case-studies: the potential effects of Bt cotton adoption in Mali, and the actual farm level effects of Bt cotton in Burkina Faso. This activity will generate a validated a ready-to-use methodology, as well as policy findings as to possible improvements to sustain or improve the likelihood of Bt cotton being a successful technology in the region. The second activity will explore gender differences in the adoption of genetically modified crops in developing countries. The overall objective of this study is to identify the social, economic and institutional factors that differentiate women and men’s attitudes and risk perception toward biotechnology. To accomplish this objective, the study will provide insight to the multiple variables that act to influence women and men’s knowledge of biotechnologies, and provide a more comprehensive understanding of how that knowledge may influence their attitude towards agricultural innovation, and ultimately impact their practice or farming techniques. The findings should inform agriculture policy design and encourage gender-sensitive policies that will direct agricultural innovations to women and men farmers equally, for beneficial impacts to the overall economy.

CGIAR Priorities
5A, 5B, 5D
Countries of Planned Research
Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania
Intended Users
Regional biosafety and biotechnology regulators, national regulators and researchers, national and international policymakers, local, national and regional organizations.
Outcome
A validated method is used by regulators in assessing or monitoring biotechnology crops in West Africa; policy recommendations encourage gender-sensitive improvements in the design of policies and technologies.
Impact
Improved access and better distributed benefits from existing or new biotech crops that contribute to increase income for the rural poor."

Output Target
Year Target Type Target Description
2011
Practices
A common methodology evaluating socioeconomic impacts of biotech crops is tested in Burkina Faso.
2011
Practices
A protocol is being developed on evaluating the gender effects of biotech crops.

Note: Financial Tables, Target Regions, CGIAR Priorities and Financing Sources show aggregated data for more than one MTP project and in particular for: - Subtheme 9.1: Genetic Resource Policies for the Poor (GRP 1) - Subtheme 9.2: Agricultural Science, Technology and Innovation Policy (GRP 31) - Subtheme 9.3: Program on Biosafety Systems (GRP 34)


Allocation of Member, Non-Member Grants and other sources to projects, 2009-2011
in $millions

Project Member Actual
2009
Estimated
2010
Proposal
2011
Project Total
6.841
7.879
7.706
Theme 9: Science and TechnologyMemberBrazil
0.003
0.004
0.000
FAO
0.000
0.002
0.000
IDB
0.040
0.000
0.000
IDRC
0.057
0.075
0.087
IFAD
0.061
0.000
0.000
Japan
0.045
0.000
0.000
Sweden
0.046
0.000
0.000
United States
3.842
3.623
3.496
World Bank
0.000
0.085
0.069
Non MemberAgricultural Research Council
0.104
0.165
0.192
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
0.858
0.988
1.172
Confederacion Colombiana de Algodon
0.008
0.000
0.000
Ethiopia
0.019
0.076
0.000
IKP Trust
0.036
0.202
0.250
Mercy Corps
0.029
0.096
0.092
Others
0.158
0.257
0.204
OXFAM
0.007
0.045
0.003
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
0.038
0.047
0.066
Wageningen University
0.029
0.000
0.000
Unres+Other SourcesUnres+Other Sources
1.461
2.214
2.075


Allocation of Project Costs to CGIAR Priorities, 2009-2013
in $millions

Project Actual
2009
Estimated
2010
Proposal
2011
Plan 1
2012
Plan 2
2013
Priorities
Theme 9: Science and Technology
Project Total
6.841
7.879
7.706
8.015
8.336
1A
0.918
1.058
1.034
1.077
1.120
1B
0.019
0.022
0.022
0.022
0.023
1C
0.019
0.022
0.022
0.022
0.023
2C
0.451
0.520
0.509
0.529
0.550
2D
0.575
0.662
0.647
0.673
0.700
3A
0.441
0.507
0.496
0.516
0.537
3B
0.038
0.044
0.043
0.045
0.047
4D
0.616
0.709
0.694
0.721
0.750
5A
1.683
1.938
1.896
1.973
2.052
5C
0.757
0.872
0.853
0.887
0.923
5D
0.365
0.420
0.411
0.427
0.444
Development Activities
0.480
0.553
0.540
0.562
0.584
Stand-alone Training
0.479
0.552
0.539
0.561
0.583


Project investment by developing Region, 2009-2013
in $millions

Project Target Regions Actual
2009
Estimated
2010
Proposal
2011
Plan 1
2012
Plan 2
2013
Project Total
6.841
7.879
7.706
8.015
8.336
Theme 9: Science and TechnologyAsia
1.043
1.528
1.865
1.940
2.018
CWANA
0.000
0.188
0.000
0.000
0.000
LAC
0.401
0.675
0.340
0.354
0.368
SSA
5.397
5.488
5.501
5.721
5.950