2011-2013
Subtheme 8.1: Diet Quality and Health of the Poor (GRP 24)
Centers/ProgramsIFPRI
Target RegionsAsia, CWANA, LAC, SSA
Countries of Planned Research Potential Beneficiary Countries
 
Burundi, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Cambodia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Uganda, Vietnam
 
Burundi, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Cambodia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Uganda, Vietnam
CGIAR Priorities
2C - Enhancing nutritional quality and safety
3A - Increasing income from fruit and vegetables
3B - Income increases from livestock
3C - Enhancing income through increased productivity of fisheries and aquaculture
4A - Integrated land, water and forest management and landscape level
4C - Improving water productivity
5A - Science and technology policies and institutions
5B - Making international and domestic markets work for the poor
5C - Rural institutions and their governance
5D - Improving research and development options to reduce rural poverty and vulnerability
Development Activities - Development Activities
New Research Areas - New Research Areas
Financing Sources
Members: IDRC, United Kingdom, United States, World Bank

Non Members: AED, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Concern Worldwide, Deustche Weth, Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition, HarvestPlus/CP, Helen Keller International, Others, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, UNICEF, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Unres+Other Sources, World Food Program (WFP)
Project Overview and Rationale

With globalization, urbanization, economic growth, technology, and market structure changes, diets and lifestyles have been changing rapidly over the past few decades. While poor people are generally more likely to meet their energy (calorie) needs than before, the overall quality of their diet has not necessarily improved and may actually have deteriorated over time. Poor diet quality and related illnesses and nutrition deficits has thus become the most pressing nutritional concern among the poor today. IFPRI’s project on Diet Quality aims at generating a global understanding of the main drivers of current trends in diet quality in order to identify effective policy levers to improve the diet quality of the poor and reduce food insecurity and under- and over-nutrition. The project comprises three components: (1) Undernutrition and micronutrient malnutrition; (2) The nutrition transition, obesity, and diet-related chronic diseases in the context of globalization; and (3) Agriculture and health.

The undernutrition and micronutrient malnutrition component of this project focuses on the strategies that can improve diet quality among the poorest and most vulnerable members of society, including infants, young children, and women.

The nutrition transition, obesity, and diet-related chronic diseases component of this project was concluded in 2008.

Overall, the program includes particular emphasis on the opportunities presented by agricultural practices, policies, and processes to support the promotion of good diet quality, health and nutrition. The research project is thus the focal point for the emerging Agriculture and Health Research Platform (AHRP), an initiative that spans different themes within IFPRI, across the sister centers in the CGIAR, and has strong collaborative links to health organizations, notably the World Health Organization (WHO). The initiative is driven by the evidence that poor health can compromise the ability to reduce poverty, and that agriculture, including agricultural research can play a role in reducing ill-health.

Goals and Objectives

The overall goal of this project is to build a greater understanding of diet changes among the poor, and identify food policies and interventions to improve diet quality. Specifically, the project seeks to answer the following questions:

  1. What strategies can improve diet quality for the poorest, most vulnerable, women and their children, and how can we measure progress?
  2. How and why are diets changing across different types of households and among different household members, including women, in countries at different stages of the nutrition transition?
  3. What policies are needed to reorient these changes?
  4. What are the “win-win” solutions for both agriculture and diet quality?

 



Project Outputs
Output Title
1: Innovative integrated approaches and packages of interventions are developed, implemented and evaluated in partnerships with governments, UN agencies or private voluntary organizations, to improve infant and young child feeding practices, growth and micronutrient status (e.g., large-scale integrated maternal and child health and nutrition [MCHN] programs with or without food assistance; agriculture interventions such as orange flesh sweet potato promotion and homestead food production programs targeting small-scale farmers, especially women; social protection programs, including nutrition interventions) (3 years)
Output Description
This work involves developing, testing, monitoring and evaluating different packages of interventions and delivery systems to improve maternal and child undernutrition. These include agriculture-focused interventions (such as homestead food garden programs) as well as interventions focused on the health, education or social development sector. The research will be carried out in close collaboration with program implementers (from UN agencies, to government programs, to international and local PVOs).
CGIAR Priorities
1B, 5B, 5D
Countries of Planned Research
Burundi, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Cambodia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Uganda, Vietnam
Intended Users
Program/policy implementers: governments, UN implementing agencies, private voluntary organizations.
Outcome
Well-documented examples and synthesis of successful and cost-effective approaches and packages of interventions to improve maternal and infant and young child nutrition are generated; programs are designed and implemented using lessons learned from the research.
Impact
Cost-effective, successful integrated programs that improve the growth of infants and young children and reduce micronutrient malnutrition among mothers and children are implemented in several countries. Some of these programs are in the process of being scaled up in a few countries. "

Output Target
Year Target Type Target Description
2010
Policy strategies
Lessons learned start to be distilled from analyses on large scale agriculture-health/nutrition programs; and MCHN programs.
2010
Practices
Other large scale agriculture-health/nutrition programs; and MCHN programs designed and in the process of being strengthened, evaluated.
2011
Capacity
Capacity to design, implement, evaluate, and maintain sustainable programs to improve maternal and child nutrition is strengthened in countries where evaluations have been carried out at local, regional, and national level.
2011
Policy strategies
Lessons learned start to be distilled from analyses on large-scale agriculture-health/nutrition programs; and MCHN programs.
2011
Practices
Other large-scale agriculture-health/nutriton programs; MCHN programs; or social protection programs designed and in the process of being strengthened and evaluated.

Output Title
2: Program options and strategies for increasing the positive synergies between agriculture and health are identified (Agriculture and health component).
Output Description
This project component relates to the work of the IFPRI-facilitated Agriculture and Health Research Platform (AHRP) which is a “CGIAR-plus” initiative with strong buy-in on the part of several health organizations, notably WHO. The goal of the Platform is to promote and coordinate research on the two-way linkages between agriculture and health, with the aim of alleviating food and health insecurity through enhanced policy and program effectiveness. Priority research areas include the interactions between agriculture and HIV/AIDS, avian influenza and other zoonoses; nutrition, diet and health; food safety and growing food supply chains; water-borne diseases and water management; and occupational health (including pesticide hazards). Environmental change, with its linkages to climate change, will provide the long-wave dynamic backdrop to much of this work.
CGIAR Priorities
3A, 3B, 3C, 5D
Countries of Planned Research
Ghana, Kenya, Cambodia, Nigeria, Senegal
Intended Users
Agricultural and health researchers and project managers; development agencies.
Outcome
Intended users build more health work into agricultural research, programs, investments and policies, and vice versa.
Impact
Agricultural research, programs, investments and policies benefit health and vice versa."

Output Target
Year Target Type Target Description
2010
Policy strategies
Best practices on maximizing agriculture-health synergies are developed, disseminated and applied to intended users through the governance structures, communications, and capacity strengthening efforts of the Agriculture and Health Research Platform (AHRP)

Note: Financial Tables, Target Regions, CGIAR Priorities and Financing Sources show aggregated data for more than one MTP project and in particular for: - Subtheme 8.1: Diet Quality and Health of the Poor (GRP 24) - Subtheme 8.2: Food and Water Safety Policies (GRP 40)


Allocation of Member, Non-Member Grants and other sources to projects, 2009-2011
in $millions

Project Member Actual
2009
Estimated
2010
Proposal
2011
Project Total
7.858
11.170
14.848
Theme 8: Diet, Health and Food SafetyMemberIDRC
0.434
0.462
0.229
United Kingdom
1.165
0.670
0.419
United States
0.000
0.048
0.000
World Bank
0.017
0.025
0.201
Non MemberAED
0.631
2.576
5.989
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
0.651
1.038
1.623
Concern Worldwide
0.000
0.176
0.000
Deustche Weth
0.008
0.000
0.000
Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition
0.067
0.264
0.202
HarvestPlus/CP
3.959
4.418
4.418
Helen Keller International
0.003
0.094
0.117
Others
0.029
0.097
0.000
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
0.001
0.020
0.039
UNICEF
0.011
0.038
0.058
University of Kwazulu-Natal
0.004
0.000
0.000
World Food Program (WFP)
0.000
0.000
0.363
Unres+Other SourcesUnres+Other Sources
0.878
1.244
1.190


Allocation of Project Costs to CGIAR Priorities, 2009-2013
in $millions

Project Actual
2009
Estimated
2010
Proposal
2011
Plan 1
2012
Plan 2
2013
Priorities
Theme 8: Diet, Health and Food Safety
Project Total
7.858
11.170
14.848
15.443
16.060
2C
1.886
2.681
3.564
3.707
3.855
3A
0.596
0.848
1.127
1.172
1.219
3B
0.596
0.848
1.127
1.172
1.219
3C
0.614
0.874
1.161
1.208
1.256
4A
0.118
0.168
0.223
0.232
0.241
4C
0.118
0.168
0.223
0.232
0.241
5A
0.151
0.214
0.285
0.296
0.308
5B
0.151
0.214
0.285
0.296
0.308
5C
0.151
0.214
0.285
0.296
0.308
5D
2.062
2.931
3.895
4.053
4.214
Development Activities
0.786
1.116
1.485
1.544
1.606
New Research Areas
0.629
0.894
1.188
1.235
1.285


Project investment by developing Region, 2009-2013
in $millions

Project Target Regions Actual
2009
Estimated
2010
Proposal
2011
Plan 1
2012
Plan 2
2013
Project Total
7.858
11.170
14.848
15.443
16.060
Theme 8: Diet, Health and Food SafetyAsia
2.237
3.020
4.270
4.529
4.644
CWANA
0.095
1.779
0.078
0.082
0.089
LAC
0.698
0.782
3.440
3.495
3.654
SSA
4.828
5.589
7.060
7.337
7.673